Welcome to the Online Clann Tartan Newsletter for April 2004


Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Board Minutes

Clann Tartan Board Meeting February 7, 2004

In Attendance: Marty Byers, Rob Portinga, Cindy Lanphear, Glenn McDavid, Jaimie Zaugg, Rudy Borrman, Brenda Bartel, David Vavreck, Eric Ferguson, Hellen Ferguson

The Minutes of the January Board Meeting were approved.

Old Business: Cindy has not finished the Staff Manual. She will pass it on to her successor.

Budget: There is a cheaper option for garage storage which we need to investigate.

Camp Representative: There was a report of Clann weaponry being used at non-Clann events. The Captain was asked about this and he said it was not true. The issue is closed.

Rob presented the draft purchase order and associated policies. Jaimie said that a provision for emergencies was needed. The minimum amount for a PO was revised downward. As amended, the proposal was approved and the Treasure will prepare a record of action for the next Board Meeting.

Animal Policy: The proposal to ban all animals is seen by many to be too strict. What about animals for demos (as opposed to pets)? What if the members doing a demo with animals have their own insurance? Will a posted warning help our liability situation? There is a distinction in law and perhaps insurance between "pets" and "livestock". This will be investigated by David and Rob. Brenda suggested that we should bring this up at membership meeting.

One implication of having animals is that they bring flies. We must continue to emphasize kitchen cleanliness. We should also set up the kitchen as far from the animals as possible.

Rob will prepare a Record of Action.

Treasurer: Currently Clann has both a savings and a checking account. The interest on the savings account is insufficient to offset the fees on the checking account. Rob proposed moving all of our funds to a single "business checking" account that would save us money. This was moved/seconded/carried unanimously.

The Secretary was reminded of the policy about publishing financial amounts in the Newsletter copy of the minutes, which is a public document. However, this information must always be provided to members upon request to a Board member.

David asked about unspent amounts in the current Company budget (his inquiry also applies to the camp budget). The question is whether they can be carried forward into the new year. The answer is no. However, there is still some time on the current budget; it applies until April 1.

The Captain and the HCF were reminded of the importance of keeping their own financial records, in addition to those of the Treasurer.

The Captain was asked whether some ancillary items for the new weaponry were included in the initial budgets for those pieces. He replied that they were. Issue closed.

The meeting was adjourned to make way for the Membership meeting.


Clann Tartan Membership Meeting February 7, 2004

In Attendance: Marty Byers, Rob Portinga, Cindy Lanphear, Glenn McDavid, Jaimie Zaugg, Rudy Borrman, Brenda Bartel, David Vavreck, Eric Ferguson, Hellen Ferguson, Bruce and Julie Yoder, Mary McKinley, Rylla, Mark, Heidi Johnson, Lynne Heffernan.

Upcoming Events. Ramble is a week away.

No Mac Faire this week, but it will be replaced by the new summer Scottish Faire in Dakota County. This event seems very promising.

Secretary's Report: Newsletter publishing is back on track.

Camp Rep's Report: No concerns.

Company Rep's Report: we need more communication about upcoming events.

Communications: Rob proposed that we allow for payment of membership dues by Paypal. The only concern was the handling fee. Since this will explicitly spelled out, a motion to implement Paypal payments was moved/seconded/passed. Rob will set this up.

Dance guild: We are doing some new dances now. Also, our listing in Scottish News in Minnesota needs to be updated to include the Inver Grove Heights location. Mary will contact Babs about this.

Music Guild: The intent is to play both dance and military music, the latter with drums and fifes. David would like to have our drilling conducted by drum commands rather than voice, this being period correct.

Historic Site: Construction of the village associated with the fort has begun. There will be monthly work weekends there. We are expecting a bigger Tactical this year. Eric Flint, the well-known author of _1632_ and its sequels, is interested in attending. Marty will follow up with Eric.

Budget: The proposed budget was discussed at length, with most attention devoted to the Garage/Storage issue. The question is whether the proposed new site really provides enough advantages over the current garage to justify the much higher cost. As a result the budget item for the new garage was tabled. The Captain, HCF, and QuarterMaster will investigate the situation at both the current and proposed sites and determine what action should be taken about this. The budget was passed with this item being tabled.

Additional Fundraising methods were discussed. Targeted letters to corporations are one option, as are the use of Matching Fund programs

Officer elections:

President: Mary McKinley
Vice President: Bruce Yoder
Treasurer: Rob Portinga
Camp Rep: Vacant. Diane Stebbins will serve as an interim.

The proposed ByLaw changes for membership and holding office were discussed and passed with amendments.

Respectfully Submitted,
Glenn McDavid
Clann Tartan Secretary



Minutes of Clann Tartan Board Meeting March 1, 2004

In attendance: Mary McKinley, Rob Portinga, Brenda Bartel, Bruce Yoder, Diane Stebbens, Glenn McDavid, Marty Byers, Herb Lindorff, Eric Ferguson

Minutes from the February meeting were approved as corrected.

Staff Manual: Mary does not have it. Rob will ask Cindy about it.

Garage: Herb said that there are other issues besides size and cost, such as humidity control and fire insurance.

We need to measure the size of the current garage. Herb will do this. The proposed new one is 10 x 20. Note that there is some lumber in the current garage that is to go to Dun Gowan. Once that is done, the available space will be increased.

The rent for the current garage is $25/month for 2004. Rob said that we are paid through March. He mentioned that some of our rent checks have not been cashed. This may explain some of the inconsistencies between our totals and Jim McGuire's.

Mary said that if we continue to use Jim's garage, we must have a written contract. Furthermore, the Board should negotiate directly with Jim, not involving other Clann members as intermediaries.

Purchase Orders: Rob presented the revised proposal and will prepare a Record of Action.

Receipts are required for all purchases. A provision for emergencies (e.g. replacing the trailer tires on a trip) is included. In such an emergency the Board will review the purchase ASAP.

Note that the purchase order policy is comprehensive. A P.O is required for even for items that have been budgeted and approved.

Animal Policy: Some provision for animals (e.g. horses and goats) in our demos is desirable. They would enhance the period appearance that we are trying to project.

It was noted that if the owner of an animal has an insurance policy, that policy would have to be posted with Clann.

Rob still needs to contact our Insurance Agent about the issues here. Also David has not reported back on what State Law says about this. Hence the subject was tabled until the next meeting.

Subscriptions to Black Powder newsletters: Is Smoke and Fire really relevant to us? Powderhorn does list some Scottish events. Does S&F? Unless we get more information, Mary would like to maintain the current situation.

Reports:
Vice President: The recruitment flyer has been edited. Is there a possibility of pro-rating dues for members who join in the middle of our fiscal year? Apparently not: It was tried before, and proved to be unmanageable.

Treasury: Current bank balance is $8869, but that includes $430 in the old budget.

The bandolier proved to be cheaper than the Company had budgeted. Does the company get to keep the difference to spend on something else? Yes, but they have to go through the approval process for the spending.

Secretary: The March newsletter has been delayed. The Secretary will send a notice about this to the members' email list.

QuarterMaster: Herb is quitting his day job. This means that we will have to find an alternative facility for welding and similar jobs that were done at his shop.

Camp Rep: Nothing New.
Company Rep: The P.O. policy needs to be spelled out in a Newsletter article. The Company Rep reminded everyone to let her know if there are any problems. She would prefer to hear about them first from the Staff and Board.

Dance Guild: Still meeting. Copies of the Calling Book have been distributed. Other members have picked up the calling with Mary and Julie both being out.

Music Guild: Skipped.
Historic Site: Skipped.

Fiber Guild: Is it still functioning? We need to have an official contact for Clann. Diane volunteered.

Sword Guild: Marty has a book on Highland Sword Fighting. He is willing to be the official contact. Rob Johnson is another possibility. Where is the Clanning fencing gear? Some of it is in the garage. We need more precise information.

Night at the Pub: Still going on. Back to Molly Quinn's for March.

Clarification on the membership/voting policy: The Captain and the HCF will keep attendance lists for events. The Secretary will record attendance at Board Meetings.

Upcoming Events: Sioux Falls has contacted us. We are trading information with Caledonia. Rob expects to hear more by next month.

Another possibility is the Duluth RenFaire, a small event which used to be just artisans.

We will be doing a demo for the Red Wing Civil Air Patrol on Saturday, April 3. This will be a short (one afternoon) event.

Minnesota Scottish Faire: Rob will prepare a general description of Clann Tartan and get it to Mary.

The successor event(s) to the Rosenthorne festival (e.g. Stirling) were mentioned. Considering our experience last year, the Board is not enthusiastic about getting involved. Mary is doubtful about whether any such event will actually happen.

The Scottish weekend at the Minnesota Ren Faire will be the first weekend, not mid-September as in the last two years.

New Business: Mary outlined her Presidential expectations:

Board Members are expected to attend meetings, follow up on issues, and treat people professionally.

She would like to have the Newsletter become an on-line publication. The Secretary and the Newsletter Editor will follow up on this.

What are our goals as Clann Tartan? Why are we here? We need a Mission Statement. It would also be good to have statements from members about what Clann means to them.

Manuals: Edition 6 has been prepared. Staff will help with final editing and tweaking. We need to look into alternatives for printing it--the cost may be high.

Rob proposed breaking up the Manual into separate books. One part would be the official Corporate Manual and Policies, to be distributed to all members. Muster information would be in a second book.

Respectfully Submitted,
Glenn McDavid
Clann Tartan Secretary

top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Board & Staff

If you need to contact someone associated with Clann Tartan, here is where you find out how. If you are unsure who to contact, you can always email us at: info@clanntartan.org

Board Members

President Mary McKinley 651-699-6853 mairi2@juno.com
Vice President Bruce Yoder 651-698-8375 bruceyoder@juno.com
Secretary Glenn McDavid 651-490-1842 gmcdavid@comcast.net
Treasurer Rob Portinga 651-486-6200 rob@portinga.org
Quarter Master Herb Lindorff 612-827-4440 deeptinker@hotmail.com
Camp Rep. -Interim Diane Stebben 651-489-2881  
Company Rep. Brenda Bartel 651-335-5097 socks142@aol.com

Staff

Captain David Vavreck 612.378.1973 baethan1630@yahoo.com
Lieutenant Eric Ferguson 612.726.6364  
Head Campfollower Marty Byers 651.483.1173  
Assistant Head Campfollower Heidi Johnson 612.702.4269  
Corporal Rob Johnson 612.702.4274 roguerpj@mn.rr.com
Corporal Annie Breese 507.280.8679  
Corporal Hellen Ferguson 612.726.6364 hellen@sparkyferguson.net
Goodwife Julie Yoder 651.698.8375 julieyoder@juno.com
Goodwife Maeve Kane 952.461.4666  
Goodwife Judy Byers 651.483.1173  

top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Guilds

Gaffney's Fife and Drum

Fifers will henceforth be meeting at Maeve's house every 2nd & 4th Monday of each month from 7pm to 9pm. Contact David for directions.

Drummers continue to meet at 11am the third Saturday of each month at Eric and Hellen's, followed by Regimental Drill at Noon. The Regiment owns two drums, but drummers are requested to get their own drumsticks.

Interest is high; I am well pleased.

A note for soldiers - according to the articles of war, it is a crime punishable by death not to learn the drum calls. Be forewarned.

We have set up a yahoo group for the Corps at http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/clannfifeanddrum/ so we can communicate without clogging up non corps folks' e-mail.

Again, drummers will work primarily on period military music for the time being, and fifers will be working on that as well as dance music.

All are welcome - no experience neccessary.

Anyone interested in joining up contact Clann's Music Chair at:

David Vavreck
baethan1630@yahoo.com
612-378-1973

Dance

1st & 3rd Wednesdays
One Grenoble Ave, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55076

The community center for Skyline Village, on the east side of Concord St. at 75th St in Inver Grove Heights. About 2.5 miles south of I494

2nd & 4th Tuesdays
Saint Christopher's Episcopal Church, 2300 N Hamline Ave. in St. Paul.

It is at the northeast corner of Highway 36 and Hamline Avenue (Hamline is between Snelling and Lexington). The church is actually encircled by the highway entrance ramp.
The Dance Guild gathers weekly from 7PM-9PM to learn and practice historic Scottish country dances.
For more information call:

Mary at 651-699-6853 or Julie at 651-698-8375

It's a great place to meet people !

Other Guilds

Want to learn about wool spinning, weaving, or dying? Kali Pederson (651-730-5437 ) and Sandy Borrmann (651-489-2881) organize the Fiber Guild.

We are lucky to have two very qualified "Sword-Masters" in our group who can teach you our sword drills as well as how to handle other weapons. Contact Jen McDermott or Rudy Borrman (651-489-2881) for more information.

Clann Tartan has our own historic site near Duluth MN. Dun Gowan is an ongoing project, which is the site of Gaffneyis Annual Tactical in July. We are finishing the fort and beginning the construction of a village this year. Contact David Vavreck at 612-378-1973 or baethan1630@yahoo.com for further information, or to volunteer to help.

top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Announcements

From the President

I've been a member of Clann Tartan for about 10 years now, and at the last Board meeting, I sat down and thought about goals. I know this sounds like a boring subject, and since I'm deep in writing policies and procedures at work it probably has something to do with my train of thought.

Goals.

Please send me either by snail mail (1363 Jefferson Ave, St Paul, MN 55105-2410) or email (Mairi2@juno.com) what your goals are for Clann Tartan. Where would you like to see us heading? What are your favorite things to do? What do you never want to see again? If you were president, what direction would you chose?

Personally, I'm all for more school shows - more education to the kids, make history interesting and interactive rather than dry, boring dates in a textbook. I would also like to see more skits - more interacting between members at events rather than just sitting about and chatting. I don't miss the old days where people only came to party after hours and did, until 3-4 an the morning, ralfing behind tents...

Those are a couple of my goals to get you started. Send me anything. I'll read them all.

PS: A big thank you to everyone who visited, called, or sent cards and flowers during my all too lengthy illness. I am in the recovery phase, at least I'm back at work half time and sometimes making it to 9:30 PM before I have to go to bed, (watch out Dancer Guild - I'm almost back!), and as long as I continue to take my "rat poison" (thanks, Bruce!) I should continue to do well. Thank you again - another good reminder that "Clan" means "family". I feel blessed.

Wanted one Camp Representitive......

"So what is a Camp Rep?"

Article V, under Responsibilities and Duties 5-03 f and g states: "...represent camp concerns to the board of directors" Well that is the official definition, but it is rather vague. I was asked to write a bit more about it. Basically the representative position is to be a liaison between two parties or individuals. It is usually providing communication between or support for the membership, the staff, and the board of directors. Most of the time it involves communicating concerns and suggestions, but can also involve helping to resolve and clarify conflicts. From my experience the Rep needs to be active in the group, attend board meetings, be proactive when possible concerns arise, be open to listening and never take things too personally. The added bonus is you never have to it alone, even though the representative positions are split between the camp and the company, they pretty much tag team the responsibilities.

I was told when I took the position that depending on what happened with the group the Rep's position could be the easiest or the most difficult position on the board. In the past year I have seen both good and not-quite-so good times. But it has always been rewarding. If this sounds like something that you would be interested in please let one of the board members know. If you are interested, but have further questions feel free to drop me an E-mail or give me a call. I would be more then happy to discuss it with you. Look forward to seeing everyone at the next membership meeting in May.

Brenda K. Bartel
Company Representative
651 335 5097
socks142@aol.com


Drill

Clann's monthly drill will be held on the third Saturday of the month at Bossen Field by Lievtenant Eric and Hellen's home (5732 Bossen Terrace Apt#2), unless there is a scheduled Clann Event that weekend.
The time is NOON.
For directions, Lievtenant Eric can be contacted at: 612-726-6364 or eric@celticfringe.net

Wanted!

Submissions for the Newsletter!
Items you can submit include research articles, character sketches, and other items pertaining to living history and Scottish Culture. Email your items in either plain text, or MS Word format to newsletter@clanntartan.org or snail mail to our postal address.
Items must be received by the 15th of each month to be considered for inclusion for the upcoming months issue. Mailed submissions will not be returned unless requested. All pertinent submissions will be considered as space permits. All research articles must reference at least three sources. Submissions are NOT edited for spelling or grammar, but may be broken in multiple parts.

top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Special

WANTED: ISO Nice small family or couple for outgrown 4 year old "Panther" Wall Tent. Babies, playpens, dogs and teenagers are busting the seams of a 10' x 14', 13 oz sunforger wall tent with 4' walls, double doors, 5 in stove pipe hole, 8''sod cloth. Have found new means to restrain teenagers so we will include tent poles and ropes, the 2 patches are included for free! $ 450.00.
Kali Pederson 651-730-5437


top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

17th Century Footwear

Seventeenth Century Footwear
By David Vavreck

It has been said that one can judge a living history group's dedication to accuracy in their portrayal by looking at their feet.

Period correct footwear can be one of the more difficult and expensive items in putting together a period outfit. Following is the result of research on period footwear, with the intention of improving this part of our presentation.

There is a glossary at the end of this article. Hopefully, I have glossed everything neccessary. Also, you will find a short list of businesses that sell ready made period footwear.

As you know from reading your manuals, Scotsmen - especially Highlandmen - frequently went barefoot in our period. Unfortunately for us, we have a rule against going barefoot at shows; there have been too many trips to the hospital for stitches and such over the years. Broken glass was something 17th century Highlanders would have rarely encountered.

In the past, members of Gaffneyis Regiment have generally worn one of four types of footwear: moccasins, ghillies, latchet shoes, and high boots (this is the proper term; the term "bucket tops" is later).

There were many different types of shoe in the period in question. Two of the above-mentioned four types of footwear are not correct for us.

Moccasins, being Native American footwear, are of course not correct for Northern Europeans. Although originally allowed for new members when our organization was first beginning, thankfully, we have pretty much done away with these.

Ghillies are a whole 'nother beast. They have the advantage that they are easy to make. According to leading shoe scholars, however, ghillies as we know them are a modern invention based roughly on some surviving early medieval shoes, a result of a combination of wishful thinking and a desire to come up with something for rennaisance fairs, rendezvous, and such that is cheap, easy to make, and does not look obviously modern. There are some surviving shoes from the British Isles that vaguely resemble our ghillies, but they date to before AD 900 (Saguto, p.1, and Carlson http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SLIST2.HTM).

Even home made shoes in the 17th century were shaped to the foot unlike ghillies, which are essentially a leather bag.

The term ghillie, itself, is a modern construct (Saguto, p.1). In 1894, Mackay listed about sixteen varieties of Celtic footwear form the Middle Ages to the early modern period; nothing resembling ghilles, nor even the term itself, appears (pp.141 ff.).

There is NO documentation for anything resembling ghillies anywhere approaching our period and place. Obviously, ghillies - or anything else that predates our period by seven or more centuries - are not the ideal to which we should aspire.


Image Copyright Marc Carlson. Used with permission.

Latchet Shoes: In the 17th century, the promise of acquiring latchet shoes (along with a decent suit of clothes) was one of the reasons men would join an army in the first place. Usually constructed using a last, (but see brogues below) latchet shoes can be made with or without heels, and may have large openings, or not, between the quarters and the vamp.

Some surviving latchet shoes have hobnails attached to extend the life of the soles.

There is some evidence to suggest that rich folk had big openings, in order to show off their expensive silk hose, and poor folks' latchet shoes were "closed", i.e did not have a gap between quarters and vamp, to better protect the foot. For example, there were many closed latchet shoes found on the Swedish warship Vasa (sunk in 1628, raised in 1961), but very few open latchet shoes; this suggests a distinction in footwear between sailors and officers.

Also, Beabey (pp. 21-22, 23) suggests that open latchet shoes (being more fashionable) are civilian shoes, and closed latchet shoes (being more practical) are military.

Latchet shoes are available ready made in prices ranging from $60 to ca. $540, although some of the cheaper ones have soles that are glued on, rather than stitched. I saw a pair of these lose their soles to the mud last summer.

Another option is to modify a pair of modern shoes.

High Boots are certainly correct, especially for officer portrayals, although there is documentation of Scottish Infantry Captains who wore latchet shoes in the Thirty Years War (1618-1648) and the British Civil War (1638-1651). They are designed for riding, not walking, so they were common amongst cavalry and the gentlemanly class who could afford horses. Musketeers and other low-lifes would sometimes wear high boots, but they were putting on airs doing so. Or, as Beabey points out (p.22), it is likely that period illustrations of pikemen and musketeers wearing high boots are depictions of dragoons (i.e. mounted infantry).

High boots can also be bought ready made at prices ranging up to $800 or more - see below.

Or one can modify a pair of modern boots (surplus East German Army jackboots seem to be popular for this).

**************************************************************************************

Now then - if you don't want to plunk down $150 for a decent pair of latchets, or up to $1000 for good pair of high boots, or if you are intimidated by the prospect of making your own, do not worry. There are other options.

A number of common types of well-documented 17th century shoe are easy to make. Amongst others, these include turnshoes, cloggis, and pampooties.


Image Copyright Marc Carlson. Used with permission.

Turnshoes: A turnshoe is a (usually) soft-soled shoe which is stitched together inside out, then turned rightside out. This method of construction protects the stitching from wear. Any shoe constructed in this manner, regardless of the form of its uppers, is a turnshoe. There were many varieties over many centuries.

Some turnshoes were so constructed, turned right side out, then had a hard sole stitched to them.

Some Scottish turnshoes were made with fashionable uppers (e.g. made to look like proper latchet shoes). These were commented upon by Englishmen, who called them single-soled shoes (proper shoes having hard soles often made of several thicknesses of leather).

Turnshoes were on the way out (in terms of fashion), being displaced by latchet shoes starting about 1570, but they certainly were still around in our period. They were cheaper than latchet shoes, so poor folks still were having them made. Rich folks still wore them indoors, as they are so very comfortable, but they were not considered suitable for dress occasions (I. M. Carlson, pers. comm.).

There are scale diagrams of surviving turnshoes in the Clann Library. Coupled with my already-made pair, which I would gladly loan out for study, anyone who can stitch leather should be able to make these.


Image drawn by David Vavreck. Used with permission.

Cloggis: A clog is any shoe with a wooden sole. Often times cloggis would be made by the person who needed them, rather than hiring a cordwainer. Also, some "traveling folk" (British so-called Gypsies) made a living making clog soles.

Cloggis are a "poverty shoe". In fact, Holmes' "Academy of Armory" published in 1688, refers to them as "Clog or countrymans shooe".

They are also very practical in Northern Climes, as wood insulates the feet much better than leather from the cold, wet ground. In one form or another, they were in use throughout much of Europe in our period.

Cloggis could and did have many different types of upper. The more one could make them look like professionally-made shoes, the less embarrassment for the wearer. I have seen cloggis made to look like latchet shoes, mules, and so on.

Regardless of the type of upper, cloggis could also have hobnails, again to increase the life of the sole.

These are even easier to make than turnshoes, requiring only a saw to shape the sole, a scissors or knife to cut the leather, and a hammer and nails to attach the leather upper to the wooden sole. Depending on type of upper desired, there is often no sewing of leather required.

It is better to use a hardwood such as oak or ash for the soles, rather than pine or some other soft wood, as hardwood soles last much longer.

Wooden soles can be carved to make arch support; for that matter, simple orthotic (corrective) cloggis can also easily be made. Simply step on your sole with damp (not dripping wet) feet. Using a pencil, have someone else draw the outline of the water pattern made by your feet as you stand (it is important to have that other person do this, as feet change shape whether one is standing or not). Then use a gouge to carve out within the lines, checking the fit periodically until you have happy feet.


Image Copyright Marc Carlson. Used with permission.

Pampooties: These are the type of shoe common in Scotland in our period for the "Clansman, tenant, and 'Humblie'" (Saguto, p1). Pampooties (the Hebridean term), cuarans (Highlands and Ireland), and rivelins (English/Scots) all refer to the same shoe, which was generally made of rawhide with the hair still on.

Unlike so-called ghillies which are a bag shoe pampooties are somewhat shaped to the foot.

In a paper written for the Appin Stewerts, a Virginia-based 18th century Scottish reenactment group fighting for Bonnie Prince Charlie, Saguto gives instructions on how to make two versions of this shoe. This paper is also in the Clann Library.

One of the varieties is based on an Aran Isle (Ireland) pampootie collected in the 19th century, which very neatly matches a description in a letter written to King Henry VIII by Scottish clerk John Elder in 1543: "After that we have slayne redd deir we flaye of the skyne bey and bey, and settinge of our bair foote on the insyde thereof, for neide of cunnynge shoemakers ... we play the sutters; compasinge and mesuringe so muche therof, as shall retche up to our ancklers, pryckynge the upper part thereof also with holis, that the water may repas when it entres, and stretchide up with a stronge thwange of the same, meitand above our saide ancklers, so, ... we make our shoois: Therefor, we usinge such maner of shoois, the roghe hairie syde outwart, in ... England, we be callit roghe footed Scottis;" (Quoted in Mackay, p.137).

This description is echoed a century and a half later: "The shoes anciently wore were a piece of the hide of a deer, cow, or horse, with the hair on, being tied behind and before with a point of leather." (Martin, p.128)

Martin also mentions the use of sealskin for such shoes (p.219).

Pampootiess have no stitching in them, being simply bound together with leather thong. Lack of stitching thread is the for homemade Scottish shoes especially those made by Highlanders - throughout our period (Mackay, p. 142)

The Aran Islanders were still making these in an unbroken tradition at least as recently as the 1980s. They are expected to last about a month of daily hard use, which should be a season or better for us.

Lest you worry about rawhide shoes wearing your feet away, they tend to pick up some moisture from the ground. This, along with simply wearing them, keeps them fairly soft. If they have not been worn for a while, they can simply be soaked in water for a bit to soften them back up. Excess water is squeezed out through the simple expedient of walking within a few minutes of putting them on.

If you would rather not use rawhide for your pampooties, though, go ahead and use tanned leather. Avoid suede; it does not last at all long. Martin indicates that the trend in the 17th century was away from rawhide to tanned leather (p.128).

**************************************************************************************

Other types of period shoe:

Brogues: These latchet shoes are a turnshoe, with a stiff sole stitched on after turning, sometimes with a low heel added as well. They were "favoured by the Scottish and Irish mercenaries who fought for numerous armies throughout Europe in the 17th century " (Beabey, p. 22). A photo of Beabey's reconstruction is found in his article on page 18. There are already instructions on making brogues in your manual.


Image drawn by David Vavreck. Used with permission.

Klompen: Dutch wooden shoes., actually used throughout much of Europe, including Spain, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, and most of Scandinavia (Wilcox). They are not easy to make without specialist tools, but very affordable to us moderns. See Sources for ready made footwear below.

Startups: Not well documented, but Beabey states that these lace-up calf boots are "believed to have seen service in many 17th century armies." (p. 22) There is a photo of a pair made by him based on a survivng boot at the Duetches Ledermuseum, Offenbach (p. 23).

Words to the wise:

For a lower-class or military impressions especially, use the leather rough side out. This was done to lessen apparent wear and tear, as the rough side doesn't scuff as easily.

If you decide to try hobnails, make sure you have two pair of period shoes. Hobnails must not be worn indoors, as they will brutalize modern flooring. I have been warned that they can also slip on pavement. They are fine in grass, dirt, or mud, though.

As far as color goes, men's shoes were not always black until the 19th century. Working class folks are usually depicted in 17th century art with tan or brown shoes and boots; rich folk also used other colours as well as black.

Sources:

Beabey, Mark. "17th Century Boots and Shoes Reconstructed" in Military Illustrated Past & Present #57, Feb 1993. This article describes the "materials, construction methods and styles of military footwear". It is by a British reenactor who is a full-time maker of reproduction leather work; see Bjarnis Boots below. In Clann Library.

Carlson, I. Marc. "Footwear of the Middle Ages: An Ongoing Examination of the History and Development of Footwear and Shoemaking Techniques up to the End of the Sixteenth Century". This online book is available at http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOEHOME.HTM. Excerpts appropriate for us are available in the Clann Library, including patterns for latchet shoes and a turnshoe (which Carlson calls a "pump").

Holme, Randle. "The Academy of Armory or, A Storehouse of Armory and Blazon". Chester, England, 1688. Marc Carlson has put the relevant shoe portion in facsimile online at http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/histshoe/holme/holme1.htm In addition to the "Clog, or countreymans shooe", this also contains woodcuts of an "Irish Broge" and an "Island shooe".

Mackay, J. G. "Notes on a Pair of Pampooties, or Shoes of Raw Hide, from Aran More, Galway Bay." Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 1893-1894 v.28 pp. 136-150.

Martin, Martin. A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland Circa 1695, etc. Introduction by Charles W. J. Withers and R. W. Munro. Birlinn Ltd., Edinburgh, 1999. In Clann Library.

Saguto, Al. "Pampooties" 1984, revised 1999. Available at www.appins.org/pampooties.htm, also in the Clann Library. Mr. Saguto is the resident cordwainer at Colonial Williamsburg.

Wilcox, Turner. "Mode in Footwear." Scribner's Sons, NY, 1948.

Sources of Ready Made Period Footwear:

Apart from the latchet shoes sold by Sykes Sutlery and Museum Replicas, I have not examined any of these products; caveat emptor. This list is provided as a service, not an endorsement. Prices generally do not include shipping.

Armlann sells a closed latchet shoe for $60, and high boots for $250. www.armlann.com/index.htm

Bjarni Boots (Mark Beaby's company) sells latchets shoes from 300 pounds, startups from 450 pounds, and high boots from 550 pounds (the pound is currently worth roughly $1.80). He also sells leather mugs, buckets, buffcoats, saddles and more. I have to believe that although pricey, his product excels. http://www.bjarnisboots.co.uk/

Bushwoman (Shirlee Pfeil) sells klompen at rendezvous (Big Island, for example) for $25. http://members.tripod.com/Bushwomans/

Historic Shoes offers a good looking closed latchet shoe for $60. www.turnshoes.co.uk/

S. B. Juniper makes several varieties of period footware, including latchet shoes, high boots, and mules in the 100-450 pound range. The work on her website looks superb. www.anaperiodshoes.co.uk/

Museum Replicas carries an open latchet shoe for $70. http://66.0.193.113/cgi-bin/www11650.storefront

Plantagenet Shoes markets several varieties of latchet shoe from 115 to 145 pounds.

www.plantagenetshoes.freeserve.co.uk/

Sykes Sutlery carries very good latchet shoes for $150. www.sykesutlery.com

Glossary:

Cordwainer - English term for a shoemaker, from Cordoba, Spain, which produced the best shoe leather for centuries (Scots corollary is cordiner)

Crooked lasted - shoes made with a left and a right, like modern shoes

Hobnails - short shanked nails with curved or pointed heads, used by soldiers to prolong the life of soles from Roman times until at least WWII

Last - a carved wooden mock foot over which shoes are stitched

Mule - a slipper-like shoe with a vamp, but no quarters

Quarters - that portion of the upper that goes around one's heel

Souter or Sutter - Scots English term for shoemaker, from the Latin sutor

Straight lasted - shoes made that could go on either foot

Upper - that portion of a shoe above the sole

Vamp - that portion of the upper that covers the front of the foot

top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Calendar of Events

Be sure to contact your staff
if you plan on attending a show event. Try to give at least a seven day notice when possible. This allows proper planning for the feeding of our members, and in some cases is required by event organizers to allow entry as a participant.
You can call any of the staff members listed, or send an email to staff@clanntartan.org.

April 2004

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

 

 

 

 
1
Dues Due
by the end of this month.
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
Clann Tartan
Board Meeting

Boltt Corporation
Conference Room
, 7PM
6
TARTAN DAY
MN State Capitol
11:30 AM
7
Dance
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
EASTER
12
Fife
Maeve's home
13
Dance

14
 
15
 
16
 
17
Drill
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
Dance
22
 
23
 
24
25
Shoemaking Workshop
@1PM
Maeve's Home
26
Fife
Maeve's home
27
Dance
28
 
29
 
30
 
 

May 2004

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
   
 

 

 

 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
Dance
6
 
7
 
8
Board Meeting
11 AM
Quartery Meeting
12 NOON
Corcoran Hall
Minneapolis
9
 
10
Fife
Maeve's home
11
Dance
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
Drill
16
 
17
 
18
Night at the Pub
19
Dance
20
 
21
 
22
Muster!
Home of Bernie
& Sharon Kriesel
23
Muster!
Home of Bernie
& Sharon Kriesel
24
Fife
Maeve's home
25
Dance
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 


June 2004

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
 
 
1 
2
Dance
3 
4  5
Siouxland Renaissance Festival
Sioux Falls, SD
10am-6pm
6
Siouxland Renaissance Festival
Sioux Falls, SD
10am-6pm
7
Clann Tartan
Board Meeting

Boltt Corporation
Conference Room
, 7PM
8
Dance
9

10
 
11
Caledonia Sesqincentenial
Caledonia, MN
12
Caledonia Sesqincentenial
Caledonia, MN
13
Caledonia Sesqincentenial
Caledonia, MN
14
Fife
Maeve's home
15
 

16
Dance
17
 
18
 
19
Drill
20
 
21
 
22
Dance
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
Fife
Maeve's home
29
 
30
 
 


 

 
  top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Maps

Map to Inver Grove Heights location- Dance Map to St. Paul location St. Christopher's- Dance
Map to Board Meetings
Boltt Corporation, 509 Sibley Street Suite 200
Saint Paul, MN 55101
Map to Board/Quarterly/Annual Meetings
Corcoran Park, Minneapolis

top
Board Minutes
Guilds
Staff & Board Directory
Calendar of Events
Announcements
Maps
Special
Event Maps and Notification
Article-17th Century Footwear

Event Maps and Notification

Good People

Now that you have read the shoe research article, I bet you are all excited to make historically correct footwear.

In order to facilitate this keen desire on your part, we have taken the opportunity to hold a period shoemaking workshop.

Clann's own cordwainer, Pegeen Rozeske, has agreed to help out. Our first workshop will focus on pampooties and cloggis - the two easiest shoes to make.

At some time in the future, we intend to have 17th c. Shoemaking 102, which would likely focus on a variety of turnshoes.

This workshop will be held Sunday, April 25th, 1 p.m. until Maeve kicks us out of her house in Elko. Please contact me (David) at baethan1630@yahoo.com or 612-378-1973 for directions.

Tools will be provided. Please let me know in advance that you are coming - and what type of shoe (or both) you wish to make - so that we can have an idea how much leather and wood to bring.

David

Siouxland Renaissance Festival (Sioux Falls, SD) June 5th & 6th 2004

Location
Sioux Falls, SD is located near the SD/MN border, approximately 270 miles from Minneapolis, MN.
Drive Time
Allow about 7 hours from the Twin Cities.
Directions
  • From the Twin Cities head South on I-35 to I-90.
  • Take I-90 West Sioux Falls, SD.
  • Go South on I-29 about 6.5 miles to 41st Street.
  • Turn right on 41st Street and go West about 5 miles to HWY 17
  • Go south on HWY 17 about 1/4 mile to Exit 77 - look for signs for Wild Water West - the festival is on the grounds behind the water park.
    Alternate directions - This route can save about 40 miles.
  • From the Twin Cities, Take US-169 South about 72 miles to where it becomes MN-60 West.
  • Follow MN-60 about 87 miles to I-90 West.
  • Take I-90 West to Sioux Falls, SD.
  • Go South on I-29 about 6.5 miles to 41st Street.
  • Turn right on 41st Street and go West about 5 miles to HWY 17
  • Go south on HWY 17 about 1/4 mile to Exit 77 - look for signs for Wild Water West - the festival is on the grounds behind the water park.

    top
    Board Minutes
    Guilds
    Staff & Board Directory
    Calendar of Events
    Announcements
    Maps
    Special
    Event Maps and Notification
    Article-17th Century Footwear