Welcome to the Online Clann Tartan Newsletter for August 2005


Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Announcements

There will be a neeting of the Board 7PM, August 1st, at the Yoder's. Due to lack of attendance, there WILL NOT be a August quarterly Membership meeting. All members are welcome to attend the August Board meeting, as well as any other Board meetings.

**********************************************

This is a reminder that for articles to be included in the new and revised members' manual, they need to be sent to me either at mkane@macalester.edu or at 26586 Woodcrest Circle Elko MN 55020. Articles can be of any length and should list all sources used. Some of the topics which can be covered by articles include womens' issues, Scottish homes and home life, trades, the place of religion and ministers in Scotland and Scottish military life, contemporary descriptions of Scottish life, and our pike drill.

Maeve Kane
mkane@macalester.edu
26586 Woodcrest Circle
Elko MN 55020

**********************************************

Clann Tartan is pleased to announce the opening of Colonel Gaffneis Official Sutlery!

Currently we offer tee shirts, sweatshirts, tank tops, mugs, mouse pads, bumper stickers, bibs, infant creepers, steins and totes with a variety of designs.

The online store can be found at www.cafepress.com/clanntartan. Even if you don’t have internet access, you can still order items with the attached order form and catalog--just make checks out to Maeve Kane, send your order to her, and she’ll use her credit card to ship your items directly to your house. And don’t worry about Maeve taking your check and not getting you your order--she enjoys that warm fuzzy feeling she gets from helping people, Clann enjoys the profits, and you enjoy your official Col. Gaffneyis gear--what a deal! Best of all, everything is under twenty dollars, and many items are under ten!

If you think of a design or combination you’d like but don’t see--we do requests!

 

Send your request to Maeve at mkane@macalester.edu or on your printed order form and she’ll make it for you, no extra charge. (Please note that Clann Tartan reserves the right to refuse to do a request--our online store is registered as family and kid friendly, and we’d like to keep it that way. Also note that we reserve the right to offer your design for sale on other products if we like it.)

The online store will soon be expanding to include both the printed and CD manual, paper dolls, the cook book, pet clothing, and other items--check back often!

Maeve is pictured here wearing her Uncle Gus tee shirt, size men’s small. The front design of all shirts will be positioned like hers, and shirts with back designs will have the design placed similarly on the back. Notice the nick name on the back? It’s not part of our regular line of designs--it was custom made. Get your own custom name on the back of your shirt by making a request.

**********************************************

Gaffneyis is going off to war!

http://www.ecwsa.org/Muster%20Orders/SiegeofStralsund2005.html

This November, we get to put all that drilling we do to good use. We have been invited to participate in a reenactment of the 1628 Siege of Stralsund. This is a battle that had many Scots involved in the Danish phase of the Thirty Years War. Reenactors from Europe have also been invited. This may be the largest 17th century reenactment since Virginia in 1997.

The event takes place at Fort Mifflin, Philadelphia. We will not need to bring any tents, as we will be staying in 18th century barracks (how cool is that!). Also, we will not be bringing our pikes; the other groups are nervous about skirmishing with our real pike heads.

There will be a number of vendors there who specialize in 17th century wares. There will opportunity for civilians to throw vegetables at the enemy, as well as dancing on Saturday night.

A write up on the siege itself will be in next month's newsletter.

Clann members voted to provide the first $100 towards travel expenses per member, up to twenty folks. We are looking at several travel options, the most attractive of which is renting a van (or two, depending on how many of use go). The options we are looking have a range of $50 to $150 per person travel expenses after Clann kicks in that $100.


We are asking people who plan to go to put down a $100 deposit by August 15th so that we can make the most efficient decision as to travel. If the deposit more than covers the travel expense, the excess will be refunded. This deposit is nonrefundable except if the trip is cancelled for whatever reason.

A tentative schedule follows, based on renting a van.

Schedule for Stralsund 2005 (subject to change)

Event Information: Dates: Nov 18-20, 2005

Location Fort Mifflin, Philadelphia, PA 19153 Distance one way 1,182 Miles

 

Outbound Schedule:

Thursday Nov 18

8:00 AM- depart from Minneapolis

Noon- 1hr Lunch

5PM- 1hr Dinner (Decision on Hotel Stay) if we don’t stop for the night

Midnight- ½hr Rest Break

 

Friday Nov 19

6AM- 1hr Breakfast Stop

11AM- 1hr Lunch

TBD PM- 1hr Dinner (May postpone depending on distance to site)

4PM- Estimated Time of arrival on site

 

If we do stay in a hotel Friday Nov 19

8:00 PM- 10.5hr possible Hotel stay

6:30 AM- 1/2hr Load Van

7:00 AM- 1/2hr Breakfast

Noon- 1hr Lunch Stop TBD PM

1/2hr Dinner (May postpone depending on distance to site)

 

Homeward Bound Schedule:

Sunday Nov. 20

7:30PM- 1.5hr Wrap up Dinner in Philadelphia

9PM- depart from Philadelphia

 

Monday Nov. 21

1AM- 1/2hr Rest Stop

6AM- 1hr Breakfast

Noon- 1hr Lunch

5:00- Arrive home

**********************************************

Still looking for thoughts on Why We Do What We Do

—and what will make it more fun for you.

What are you looking for in Clann? What can we do better? What are we doing well? Please let us know—we all want this to be a fun, fulfilling experience for everyone.

Send info to Mary McKinley at the previously posted info—snail mail:
Mary McKinley
1363 Jefferson Ave
St Paul, MN 55105-2410

Drill

Clann's monthly drill will be held on the third Saturday of the month at Bossen Field by Lievtenant Eric and Hellen's home (5732 Bossen Terrace Apt#2), unless there is a scheduled Clann Event that weekend.
The time is NOON.
For directions, Lievtenant Eric can be contacted at: 612-726-6364 or eric@celticfringe.net

Wanted!

Submissions for the Newsletter!
Items you can submit include research articles, character sketches, and other items pertaining to living history and Scottish Culture. Email your items in either plain text, or MS Word format to newsletter@clanntartan.org or snail mail to our postal address.
Items must be received by the 15th of each month to be considered for inclusion for the upcoming months issue. Mailed submissions will not be returned unless requested. All pertinent submissions will be considered as space permits. All research articles must reference at least three sources. Submissions are NOT edited for spelling or grammar, but may be broken in multiple parts.



Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Board Minutes

Minutes of Clann Tartan Board s Meeting
June 6, 2005

In attendance:  (Board) Mary McKinley,  Diana Steben, 
Bruce Yoder, Glenn McDavid, Sean McCanna, Herb Lindorff, David Vavreck

(Staff) Julie Yoder, Rob Johnson, Maeve Kane, Marty Byers

Heidi Johnson, Hellen Ferguson

Minutes of the May Meeting were approved.

OLD BUSINESS

Maeve's Paper Dolls:  We need to review the contract and decided how to
market them?  Are we aiming for the general public or for the re-enactor
market?

A committee was appointed to deal with these issues.  The members are
David Vavreck, Maeve Kane, Rob Johnson, and Heidi Johnson.

Manual Update:  Some old stuff that does not cite sources will be
dropped.  We are looking for volunteers from Clann for new articles.
Kass McGann will also contribute some.  Some articles from the Web site
will be included, as will David's Newsletter article on Muster levels.
The Dedication from the old manual will be included in the Introductory
material.

REPORTS

Vice President: No report

Treasurer:  The check from Charles City is in.  David will send Glenn a
list of members who have renewed.  We still do not have all the records
from the former Treasurer.

Secretary:  Glenn, Eric, and Hellen will review the Web Site.  The
Members e-mail list needs to be updated.  Another letter from Michael
McKenzie was included in the June newsletter.

Quartermaster:  Trailer repairs to happen soon (Herb is out of school).

Company Rep:  No concerns.
Camp Rep:     No concerns.

Dance Guild:  Dance calls are on Maeve's Web site.  No dance this week.

Sword Guild:  Summer meetings on the 3rd Thursday of the month.  7 PM at
the Byers home.

Drum:  Maeve has the appropriate software for converting wav files to
MP3 format.

Fiber Guild:  Received some teasels from Cindy.

Historic Site:  Maeve will deliver more wood this weekend.  The
Blockhouse is mostly chinked.

PAST EVENTS:  We have not been paid from the Scottish Ramble.

UPCOMING EVENTS:

Twig, June 11-12.  We have received a request from them for a detailed
schedule.  There was some concern from members about the requirement
that cars had to be off site Friday by 9 PM.  It was pointed out that
this was better than the original time (7 PM).  Also, the time had been
clearly stated in the initial notice to members on April 28.   


Minnesota Scottish Faire & Highland Games, Farmington -- July 9.  Our
camp location will be close to where we were last year.

Dun Gowan Tactical -- July 14-17.  We will have a food vendor.

Deer River -- 8/5-8/7 -- This event is on.  We are negotiating the
details.

Big Island:  There is a issue about where our camp will be.  We want it
where is was last year--near the front gate.

Mankato -- The event is on.

NEW BUSINESS:

Maeve presented her plan for selling T-Shirts (while modelling a
prototype) and similar things via Cafepress.  We could also, at a higher
cost, pay them to print and distribute publications.  The proposal was
well received at the meeting.

Rob presented a proposal for using Rental trucks or vans, rather than
the trailer, as an alternative means of hauling supplies.  This would
ease the burden on Marty and his truck.  The board approved a budget of
$200 to test this concept at Twig.

The issues of having members check out Clann tents and haul them to
events on their own, rather that carry them on the trailer, was
revisited.  With the trailer being repacked and the possibility of using
a truck or van, the issue of vehicle load weight seems less critical.
Furthermore, a check out/check in system would be an additional burden
to administer and adds the risk that a tent might not be returned in
time.  The sense of the meeting was that we would not implement a check
out/check in system at this time.

David reminded us that while our big trip for 2005 will be to Stralsund,
the next such trip (following current policy) would be in 2007.  That
year will be the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown, with a
big reenactment event appropriate for the occasion.

Meeting adjourned.


Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Board & Staff

If you need to contact someone associated with Clann Tartan, here is where you find out how. If you are unsure who to contact, you can always email us at: info@clanntartan.org

Board Members

President Mary McKinley 651-699-6853 mairi2@juno.com
Vice President Bruce Yoder 651-698-8375 bruceyoder@juno.com
Secretary Glenn McDavid 651-490-1842 gmcdavid@comcast.net
Treasurer David Vavreck 612-378-1973 baethan1630@yahoo.com
Quarter Master Herb Lindorff 612-827-4440 deeptinker@hotmail.com
Camp Rep. Diana Steben 612-728-1189 Rillaspins@aol.com
Company Rep. Sean McCanna 952-922-7408   macbaird@lycos.com  

Staff

Captain Marty Byers 651.483.1173 mjlbyers@msn.com
Lieutenant Eric Ferguson 612.726.6364 eric@celticfringe.net
Head Campfollower Rob Johnson 612.702.4274  roguerpj@mn.rr.com
Assistant Head Campfollower Julie Yoder 651.698.8375 julieyoder@juno.com
Goodwife Judy Byers 651.483.1173 mjlbyers@msn.com
Goodwife Maeve Kane 952.461.4666  

Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Guilds

Sword Guild:

I am now taking names of MEMBERS, who are interested in learning the period correct way to wield the blades we would have used. The methods will be totally Scottish and /or common to the Scottish Island.

But, first I need your name, mailing address, phone number and what type of sword you are interested in...and, do you have such a sword. When I have this information, we will set up a date and time to get together for our first exercise.

I hope to use some of what we learn in a skit or two during the coming years. The more blades we have to be used correctly the better we will be for the public.

So, get me this information soon and let's get started.

Sword Drill meets the THIRD Thursday of Every month, at the home of Marty and Judy Byers. In August, it will be on the 18th.

Marty L. Byers
651-483-1173


Dance

1st & 3rd Wednesdays
One Grenoble Ave, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55076

The community center for Skyline Village, on the east side of Concord St. at 75th St in Inver Grove Heights. About 2.5 miles south of I494

2nd & 4th Tuesdays
Saint Christopher's Episcopal Church, 2300 N Hamline Ave. in St. Paul.

It is at the northeast corner of Highway 36 and Hamline Avenue (Hamline is between Snelling and Lexington). The church is actually encircled by the highway entrance ramp.
The Dance Guild gathers weekly from 7PM-9PM to learn and practice historic Scottish country dances.
For more information call:

Mary at 651-699-6853 or Julie at 651-698-8375

It's a great place to meet people !

Other Guilds

Want to learn about wool spinning, weaving, or dying? Diana Steben (651-489-2881) and Kali Pederson (651-730-5437 ) organize the Fiber Guild.

Clann Tartan has our own historic site near Duluth MN. Dun Gowan is an ongoing project, which is the site of Gaffneyis Annual Tactical in July. We are finishing the fort and beginning the construction of a village this year. Contact David Vavreck at 612-378-1973 or baethan1630@yahoo.com for further information, or to volunteer to help.

Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Articles

I am proud to report that this year’s Dun Gowan Tactical went swimmingly despite what seemed to have been a rocky start. The weather complied--more than for at most of our events this year, anyway--and the dragonflies, butterflies, and fireflies added a welcome compliment to our northwoods setting. Dun Gowan has seen several site improvements this year, including a perma priv, a shower--which saw much grateful use--and a shooting range. The shooting range also saw much use, and several of our newer members including myself shot a live round out of a matchlock for the first time. I would like to congratulate David Vavreck on winning first place in the shooting contests with one of Clann’s matchlocks against several rifled and sighted flintlocks, and Jerry Iverson for his close second.

I am also proud to join the relatively small number of our members who have commanded the field at tactical. I am currently going on my third year of membership in Col. Gaffneyis, and in my second year at tactical I found commanding even a small number of troops to be a rewarding challenge. A new commander will always make mistakes, and I made mine in spades. For that reason and others, I salute my foe Captain Martin Birse for his efforts on the field which kept me and my forces on our toes.

Unlike their commander, however, my soldiers made few mistakes if any and I commend them for that. Don Chesney, David Vavreck, Mike Rozeske, Travis Hare, Levi Rhody and Zachary Biles are all relatively old hands at events like our Dun Gowan Tactical, and performed admirably. All of these soldiers who served with me are to be commended, but Travis, Levi, and Zach in particular for their efforts in stopping enemy couriers, sneaking through enemy lines to rendezvous with allied forces, and capturing a supply base against all odds.

Our division of troops this year, as per usual, pit friend against friend and relations against each other. My opposing commander had the enviable pleasure of commanding a force made up of Jerry Iverson, Stefan Francisco, Nathaniel Rhody, David Vavreck, Mike Rozeske, Josh Biles and Shiloh Hare. Shiloh was one of two young women this year to participate militarily for the first time, and although I did not have the pleasure of serving with her, I did have the distinct pleasure of serving with one Megan Francisco, who served as my right hand the entire weekend, and I hope looks forward to many more years of service with Col. Gaffneyis. If she performs as admirably in the coming years as she did while she and I held a besieged and outnumbered fort alone, Col. Gaffneyis will have a valuable soldier who has proven herself to be literally calm under fire.

Having thanked those who have served on the field this year at tactical, I wish to close by thanking those who served off the field. I would like to thank our ever gracious host Don Chesney, our marshal Keith Chesney, Zach and Josh Biles for their help preparing the grounds, and most importantly, Renee Peterson and Pegeen Rozeske for their efforts in feeding many hungry soldiers. I regret that we could not enjoy the company of more of Col. Gaffneyis dedicated members this year, but hopefully the fates will not collude to prevent so many of our members from enjoying such a weekend next year.

Capt. "Don’t fire at will" Will’m Keane

****************************************************************************************

Musicians in Scotland, ca 1630

David Vavreck

There were many varieties of musician in our period and place; then as now, there were many more amateurs than professionals. Recorded music not being an option, most everyone was able and willing to sing or play for themselves and each other. One of the favorite pastimes in period was the singing of part songs - especially in taverns. People spent much more of their spare time than we do making music - they were raised doing so - so they were capable of performing fairly complex music even without formal training.

Common instruments amongst amateurs included fiddles (very different from violins), lutes, and various woodwinds including recorders, whistles, fifes, and tabor pipes.

Barber shops commonly had a cittern - picture a mandolin on steroids - hanging on the wall for customers to amuse themselves and each other while waiting their turn for a trim.

Other places that amateur music appeared was labor songs (especially while doing repetitive tasks such as wauking wool, rowing a boat, and such), marching songs to relieve that monotony, mothers singing lullabies, or people simply breaking into song just for the heck of it. And of course, there was singing in kirk.

Amongst professional musicians, there were many levels, including wandering minstrel types, waits, and court musicians. Red hats of whatever form were commonly worn by professional musicians throughout northern Europe, which is why I wear a red bonnet when I am portraying a fiddler.

By and large, it was not deemed appropriate for women to become professional musicians, although Ireland at least still had keeners - professional mourners - to be hired for funerals.

Itinerant (wandering) musicians were the lowest level of professional. These were men who walked from town to town, village to village, looking for a place to play. Weddings, wakes, fairs, festivals, and dances were the best gigs. The musician could be expected to be paid in food and drink, with some extra to tide him over as he walked on to the next village, and possibly a little coin as well. A documented tip I have seen is the gift of a small silk ribbon, which the musician tied around his pegboard.

Although appreciated by the populace both for their entertainment value as well as their being a primary source of news, they were not highly thought of. The locals kept a sharp eye on their purses and their daughters, and the authorities were nervous about musicians’ tendency to spread dangerous ideas.

Failing to find an event to play for, the musician would generally go to the local tavern and offer his services. Sometimes the tavern keeper would hire him, again in exchange for food and drink - and hopefully a coin or two.

Like as not, though, he had to go from table to table, essentially begging for the chance to play. This put him in danger of being arrested and fined as a vagrant (unemployed person), as well as opening himself up to maltreatment by the villagers, who held him in contempt for his inability to land a gig - not a fun way to spend a Saturday night. And if the tavern already employed a musician…

That’s where the ribbon comes in. He could sell it when all hope of a gig - and his stash of food - ran out.

Such a musician could hope to find regular employment in a tavern, being the period equivalent of a house band. That would solve the vagrancy problem, make his finances more regular, and save much wear and tear on the feet.

A tavern musician, though, was still rather low status.

If he was lucky, perhaps he would be "noticed" by someone of means, who would offer extra gigs to play for private parties and such. And a musician with otherwise steady employment often doubled as a dance master, playing the tunes while calling the dances.

If one had the skill, one could audition to join the local town waits. These were groups of musician/singers hired by municipal governments in many larger towns, and nearly all cities in western Europe. They played for special occasions such as festivals, fairs, and visits by dignitaries. They also provided Europe’s first free concerts for the public at large.

The waits’ annual pay was not bad, but the benefits were even better. The instruments - often shawms (early oboes), viols, and horns - were usually paid for by the government. They often had paid training to increase the variety of instruments they could play, to improve sight reading ability, and to get a solid background in music theory. Like soldiers, waits were provided with a set of (very distinctive) clothes each year - sometimes a lightweight suit for Summer, and a heavyweight one for Winter. And the annual pay was more or less a retainer fee. Every time they were required to play, they got paid for it.

It was easy to get supplemental gigs, music students, etc. while wearing the easily recognizable waits’ clothing, which was proof enough of their ability. To top it off, appointment to the waits was usually a lifetime contract until one was too old and decrepit to perform any more, in which case one generally got a pension.

Apart from studying music at university, about the only way to become a court musician was by being hired away from the waits. Court musicians were the most learned of the lot. They commonly sang as well as playing lutes, various keyboard instruments, viols, and sometimes violins, and made much more use of advanced musical techniques such as counterpoint.

Scotland’s Royal Court, of course, headed to England with James VI when he became England’s James I in 1603. After this, the only court musicians in Scotland were harpers and the very occasional bagpiper at local manor houses and such. Scottish harp culture was already in collapse by this time. In fact, most of the documented harpers in Scotland in the 17th century were actually émigrés and refugees from Ireland. And with the wholesale evacuation of the Scottish nobles to England, harpers too often became itinerant as well, landing gigs in manor houses only as long as they were occupied by nobles visiting home from England.

Music Education

There were numerous routes to gaining instruction in music in our period. The simplest, and perhaps most common, was simply learning from an older family member. Amongst the lower sort, this included being taught how to make the instrument itself, as well as replacement strings, tuning pegs, reeds, and the like, and also how to perform simple repairs. Needless to say, the quality of a folk fiddle does not approach that of a professionally made Guarneri or Amati violin (Stradivarius was after our period).

Children who were born blind, or were struck blind by illness or injury, often were sent off to learn the harp from a professional. The more well-to-do locals would be asked for donations to pay for this opportunity, or the villagers themselves would all pitch in to help the poor unfortunate. After ten or twenty years of apprenticeship, during which the student studied not only Celtic harp music but music of the ancient world, medieval and renaissance music, and then-current art music from all over Europe, the harper was sent out into the world. Roughly 90% of documented 16th to 18th century harpers were blind. Consider it a type of social security. Beats heck out of being set out with a bowl to beg.

If someone showed musical talent at Kirk, the minister might see to it that the child was sent off to a "Sang School" to be educated. There were several Sang Schoolis in Scotland, that of Aberdeen being the most renowned. Before it was outlawed by the Presbyterians, the Catholic Church also educated many people in music, both voice and (unlike the Presbyterians) instruments.

The merchant class and above could afford to send their children off to school, or to hire private tutors. A well-placed professional musician would do the same for his children. In fact, anyone above lower class would become a social outcast if he/she did not have formal music training.

Music Guilds

Scotland lagged far behind England in the development of guilds, and England was as far behind the rest of Europe. But professional musicians jealously guarded their position. In the cities, for example, they were able to regulate itinerant musicians - who they regarded as amateurs - or even ban them from city limits, thereby freeing up whatever gigs were available for themselves. It was also not uncommon for musicians to use their students to accompany them at gigs, charging the host for two musicians, but keeping the pay for themselves. That is part of how students paid their tuition.

Loss of gig potential

One final note: the rise of Protestantism led to a sharp decline in the standard of living amongst musicians. Protestants eliminated many feast days and holy days, which meant far fewer gigs than beforehand. Also, in Scotland in particular, the Presbyterian church banned the use of instruments at Kirk, adding many highly skilled musicians to the unemployed. Indeed, during their widespread destruction of Catholic churches in 1569-70, Presbyterians were particularly fond of smashing church instruments throughout Scotland - especially organs. Puritan soldiers did the same in Anglican churches during the British Civil Wars.

Bibliography

Collinson, Francis M. The Traditional and National Music of Scotland. Vanderbilt University Press, Nashville 1966.

Farmer, Henry George. Music in Mediaeval Scotland. W. Reeves, London 1930.

Farmer, Henry George. A History of Music in Scotland. Da Capo Press, NY 1970.

Langwill, Lyndesay Graham. Waits, wind band and horn. Hinrichsen Edition, London, 1952.

McDonald, R. Andrew, editor. History, literature, and music in Scotland, 700-1560. University of Toronto Press, Buffalo 2002.

Shire, Helena Mennie. Song, Dance and Poetry of the Court of Scotland under King James VI; musical illustrations of court-song. Cambridge University Press, London 1969

Spring, Matthew. The lute in Britain: a history of the instrment and its music. Oxford University Press, NY 2001.

Stephan, George Arthur. The waits of the city of Norwich through four centuries to 1790. Goose and Son, ltd., Norwich 1933

Woodfill, Walter L. Musicians in English Society from Elizabeth to Charles I. Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1953

****************************************************************************************


Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Calendar of Events

Be sure to contact your staff
if you plan on attending a show event. Try to give at least a ten day notice when possible. This allows proper planning for the feeding of our members, and in some cases is required by event organizers to allow entry as a participant.
You can call any of the staff members listed, or send an email to staff@clanntartan.org.

AUGUST 2005

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

 
1
Board Meeting
7PM @Bruce and Julie's 
2
 
3
Dance 
4
 
5
Deer River Rendezvous
Deer River MN 
6
Deer River Rendezvous
Deer River MN 
7
Deer River Rendezvous
Deer River MN 
8
 
9
Dance 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
Night at the Pub
Molly Quinn's
Minneapolis 
17
Dance 
18
Sword Drill at
Marty and Judy's
651.483.1173
mjlbyers@msn.com 
19
 
20
Drill 
21
 
22
 
23
Dance 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
CAMP DRILL
10AM to 4PM
Please call a staff
member for location 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 

SEPTEMBER 2005

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
Board Meeting
7PM @Bruce and Julie's  
6
 
7
Dance 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
Dance 
14
 
15
Sword Drill at
Marty and Judy's
651.483.1173
mjlbyers@msn.com 
16
 
17
Drill 
18
 
19
 
20
Night at the Pub
Molly Quinn's
Minneapolis 
21
Dance 
22
 
23
 
24
CAMP DRILL
10AM to 4PM
Please call a staff
member for location 
25
 
26
 
27
Dance 
28
 
29
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN 
30
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN 
Oct. 1
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN 

Upcoming Events:

Deer River Rendezvous--August 5-7--Deer River MN
Big Island Rendezvous--September 29-October 2--Albert Lea MN
Mankato History Fest--October 6-8--Mankato MN
Big Muddy River Rendezvous--October 11-16--Winona MN
Siege of Stralsund--November 17-20--Philadelphia PA

Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Maps

Map to Inver Grove Heights location- Dance Map to St. Paul location St. Christopher's- Dance
Map to Board Meetings
Bruce and Julie Yoder's Home
Map to Board/Quarterly/Annual Meetings
Corcoran Park, Minneapolis

Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
Announcements   Articles
     
top

Event Maps and Notification

Deer River Rendezvous Deer River, MN Aug 5th-7th 2005

Col. Gaffneyis will be attending the Deer River Rendezvous this year for the first time in ten years. Deer River Rendezvous is hosted by the White Oak Society in Deer River MN and is dedicated to a quality living history experience for patrons and participants. They have three public days, August 5, 6 and 7, but in the week before hand, the site is open to participants and all manner of workshops from glass beadmaking to weaving to canoemaking and bread baking are open to participants. The site is primitive in just the way we like it to be--there are perma privs and shower facilities availible, but no electric lighting on site and the vendors are quiet. Site security is provided, there is a reproduction fur trade era fort complete with store, bread oven and living quarters, and the site is host to an 18th century dinner on Friday night and one of the best dances on the rendezvous circuit on Saturday night. Col. Gaffneyis hopes to make a strong appearance this year.

www.whiteoak.org

Directions:

Take I-35 north to exit 237--MN 33 N toward Cloquet/Iron Range, and follow that for 11 miles. Take the US 2 ramp towards Grand Rapids/Duluth and make a left onto US 2 West. Follow US 2 for 60 miles approx. and turn left onto US 169/NE 4th St/US 2, and follow US 2 for another 15 miles. Turn right onto MN 6/Division St and follow MN 6 for a mile and a half to 33155 Hwy 6.

*************************************************************************************************

Big Island Albert Lea, MN September 29-October 2, 2004

Location
Big Island Rendevous is located in Albert Lea, MN - just off Interstate 35 about 98 miles south of the Twin Cities.
Drive Time
Allow about 2 hours from the Twin Cities.
Directions
  • From Minneapolis or Saint Paul, take I35 South to I90 in Albert Lea.
  • Take I90 West to the 90 west take exit 157 (one mile)
  • Turn Left and head South on Bridge Avenue to Hammer Road (about 1 mile).
  • Turn Right and head East on Hammer Road to the park entrance.
  • You will be able to drive on-site before and after show hours. Our camp will be located inside the park area.
    Maps



  • *************************************************************************************************

    *************************************************************************************************

    Board Minutes Staff & Board Directory Guilds
    Calendar of Events Maps Event Maps and Notification
    Announcements   Articles
         
    top