Welcome to the Online Clann Tartan Newsletter for September 2005


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Announcements

After about eighteen months of asking how to make Clann better, what people want, and where we’re going, I finally had some good, coherent thoughts and ideas presented to me. We all agree that we want to continue with teaching the historical aspects and having fun while doing so, but what frequently gets overlooked or forgotten is that we are now a small group – smaller than we have been in a very long time. We are also a volunteer group – none of us get paid. We also don’t have too many long time, experienced members that haven’t been burned out by being the only ones to step forward to cover Board and Staff positions.

It’s time to look at some changes to the system to prevent or reduce burnout, get more members involved, especially the new folk, and get back to having fun and imparting our knowledge.

One change that has been brought up more than once and by more than one person is to put less emphasis on the military. Deer River will have approximately 3 men going, and maybe 5 women. (I’m writing this before it takes place, and as we all know, numbers change.) With this spread, we can’t do effective military drills, even with the women (Thanks Maeve!) who are willing to dress and act as men. We do have an active camp life with spinners, lace makers, knitters, weavers, cooks, etc. We also have men (Thanks David!) who have a wonderful craft demo. So perhaps it’s time we rethought our military demos and drills and replaced them "domestic" demos.

Another change involves the structure of Clann Tartan as an organization. Since I joined about 10 years ago, there has been a division between Camp and Company. Sometimes the two groups have worked well together; sometimes they have never spoken to each other. Given our size, it may be time to do away with the division and unify staff.

What has been presented is to eliminate the Camp and Company divisions and simply have "Staff". These positions would be elected, as they are now. There would be a "Chief of Staff" and 3 other "Understaff" positions. The terms would run for two years, with staggered election dates so there is never a complete turnover of staff from year to year. The Staff would be responsible for coordinating with the Contractor in planning events, including but not limited to food, equipment, and transport of food and equipment to events. They would appoint a "Captain" and "Head Campfollower" for each event to run that portion of the events, to make sure that we are all fed, housed, and meet our contractual obligations.

The Board must review their performance upon complaint from other members of the staff, board or other members, and the Board can remove them from office for nonperformance, and appoint replacements between elections if someone is removed or resigns.

We will discuss these at the November Quarterly meetings and elections, and if the membership finds the change favorable we will vote for Staff in November. We will also be discussing the change in Clann direction.

One item that may have slipped by people if you don’t read the minutes – this current board has decided that to vote on any issues or positions, all you need to do is SHOW UP at the quarterly and annual meetings and be recognized by a staff and board member, and be current in your dues. If you don’t vote, you have no say in the decision.

We can’t do this without all of our members. Please show up for the discussion and vote in November.

If you have any questions or comments on these issues, please feel free to send them to me at Mairi2@juno.com
Mary McKinley
1363 Jefferson Ave
St Paul, MN 55105-2410

Thank you!

This is a reminder that for articles to be included in the new and revised members' manual, they need to be sent to me either at mkane@macalester.edu or at 26586 Woodcrest Circle Elko MN 55020. Articles can be of any length and should list all sources used. Some of the topics which can be covered by articles include womens' issues, Scottish homes and home life, trades, the place of religion and ministers in Scotland and Scottish military life, contemporary descriptions of Scottish life, and our pike drill.

Maeve Kane
mkane@macalester.edu
26586 Woodcrest Circle
Elko MN 55020

**********************************************

Clann Tartan is pleased to announce the opening of Colonel Gaffneis Official Sutlery!

Currently we offer tee shirts, sweatshirts, tank tops, mugs, mouse pads, bumper stickers, bibs, infant creepers, steins and totes with a variety of designs.

The online store can be found at www.cafepress.com/clanntartan.

**********************************************

Still looking for thoughts on Why We Do What We Do

—and what will make it more fun for you.

What are you looking for in Clann? What can we do better? What are we doing well? Please let us know—we all want this to be a fun, fulfilling experience for everyone.

Send info to Mary McKinley at the previously posted info—snail mail:
Mary McKinley
1363 Jefferson Ave
St Paul, MN 55105-2410

Drill

Clann's monthly drill will be held on the third Saturday of the month at Bossen Field by Lievtenant Eric and Hellen's home (5732 Bossen Terrace Apt#2), unless there is a scheduled Clann Event that weekend.
The time is NOON.
For directions, Lievtenant Eric can be contacted at: 612-726-6364 or eric@celticfringe.net

Wanted!

Submissions for the Newsletter!
Items you can submit include research articles, character sketches, and other items pertaining to living history and Scottish Culture. Email your items in either plain text, or MS Word format to newsletter@clanntartan.org or snail mail to our postal address.
Items must be received by the 15th of each month to be considered for inclusion for the upcoming months issue. Mailed submissions will not be returned unless requested. All pertinent submissions will be considered as space permits. All research articles must reference at least three sources. Submissions are NOT edited for spelling or grammar, but may be broken in multiple parts.



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Board Minutes

Minutes of Clann Tartan Board Meeting
July 11, 2005

In attendance:  (Board) Mary McKinley, David Vavreck,
Bruce Yoder, Glenn McDavid, Sean McCanna, Herb Lindorff

(Staff) Julie Yoder, Maeve Kane, Eric Ferguson

Heidi Johnson, Hellen Ferguson

Minutes of the June Meeting were approved as corrected.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Deer River -- 8/5 - 8/7  -- They may not be able to pay us.  There was
some discussion about whether we should do the event free, but the
eventual decision was that we would not do it unless they could meet a
minimum.  Maeve was directed to negotiate on that basis.  In any case.
we will have to do this without the trailer.  We do not have a vehicle
that can tow it and so will have to use personal vehicles.  We will need
6 people.

Circus Juventas -- Early August.  Highland Park, St. Paul.  Possibility.
Need to know more about what kind of show they want.  Some concern about
doing both this and Deer River so close together.

Shooters' Roundup -- 8/27-8/28.  We will not do this event.

Wisconsin Highland Games -- Labor Day weekend, Milwaukee suburbs.
Possibility.  This is a big event with lots of money and television
coverage.  Some concern about whether we can get organized in time to do
it properly.

Big Island -- 9/30-10/2.  Our camp will be in the same position as
last year.  They may move us in the future.

Mankato -- May be better financially than last year.

Winona -- Same terms as last year.

Stralsund -- Need to put down money by 8/15.  We may get better quarters
than last year (barracks vs. casemate).  Five present at the meeting
indicated an interest in participating.  Transporation will probably be
by van--a better one than in 2003), or by a bus (see below--QM Report)
David will do a write-up for the Newsletter.

EVENTS -- GENERAL

There is a concern about members leaving events early without prior
arrangement with staff.  This increases the burden of tear-down on 
the remaining members.

Maeve requested a reimbursement for hauling lumber to Dun Gowan.  This
is in accordance with policy and was approved.

VICE PRESIDENT'S REPORT

The Trailer license has expired and we need to renew it.  There was some
question about whether we had a lifetime license, but that seems
unlikely.

We also need to file a Corporate Statement of Operation with the State
and check with the MN Department of Revenue about our State Sales Tax
Status.

TREASURER'S REPORT

The check from Twig has been deposited, as has a payment from Pigasus
books, and two new memberships.

The Treasurer is still trying to get some old financial records.

We have about $6700 in the Bank.

CAMP REP  - No report

COMPANY REP -  "A good time was had by all"

CONTRACTS - Maeve has written up the status of all current negotiations
and the CafePress shop management information.  This was distributed to 
Board Members.

QUARTERMASTER'S REPORT - Planning trailer repairs.  May have access to a
bus that could be used for Stralsund, if some repairs are completed.
The bus has coach seats with adequate knee space.  It does not require 
a special Driver's License.

DRUM - Maeve has a microphone and can do recordings. 

DANCE - 8 more dances have been recorded.

FIBER GUILD - No report.

HISTORIC SITE - New buildings, including a shower with hot and cold
water, will be ready for Tactical.

MUSIC GUILD -- Dance CD is done.

CRAFT COMMITTEE ("Camp Drill") -- No report.

OTHER BUSINESS
--------------

MANUAL REVISION:  Deadline for articles is August 15.  The manual will
done in RTF, then formatted in HTML, and finally a pdf will be prepared
for printing.

4TH LEVEL MUSTER - There was some discussion of more specific
requirements.  This would require a ByLaw change at the Members Meeting
in February, but we should start discussion of it in the Newsletter
ASAP.

PAPER DOLLS:  Maeve has a contract.  She needs the Clann committee to
meet and respond to it.

MARK BRUCE - An old time member is returning.

NEXT MEETING - The August Members meeting will be
cancelled--historically attendance has been quite poor.  There will be a
Board Meeting on 8/1 at Yoders.  As always, all members are welcome to
attend.


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Board & Staff

If you need to contact someone associated with Clann Tartan, here is where you find out how. If you are unsure who to contact, you can always email us at: info@clanntartan.org

Board Members

President Mary McKinley 651-699-6853 mairi2@juno.com
Vice President Bruce Yoder 651-698-8375 bruceyoder@juno.com
Secretary Glenn McDavid 651-490-1842 gmcdavid@comcast.net
Treasurer David Vavreck 612-378-1973 baethan1630@yahoo.com
Quarter Master Herb Lindorff 612-827-4440 deeptinker@hotmail.com
Camp Rep. Diana Steben 612-728-1189 Rillaspins@aol.com
Company Rep. Sean McCanna 952-922-7408   macbaird@lycos.com  

Staff

Captain Marty Byers 651.483.1173 mjlbyers@msn.com
Lieutenant Eric Ferguson 612.726.6364 eric@celticfringe.net
Head Campfollower Rob Johnson 612.702.4274  roguerpj@mn.rr.com
Assistant Head Campfollower Julie Yoder 651.698.8375 julieyoder@juno.com
Goodwife Judy Byers 651.483.1173 mjlbyers@msn.com
Goodwife Maeve Kane 952.461.4666  

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Guilds

Sword Guild:

I am now taking names of MEMBERS, who are interested in learning the period correct way to wield the blades we would have used. The methods will be totally Scottish and /or common to the Scottish Island.

But, first I need your name, mailing address, phone number and what type of sword you are interested in...and, do you have such a sword. When I have this information, we will set up a date and time to get together for our first exercise.

I hope to use some of what we learn in a skit or two during the coming years. The more blades we have to be used correctly the better we will be for the public.

So, get me this information soon and let's get started.

Sword Drill meets the THIRD Thursday of Every month, at the home of Marty and Judy Byers. In September, it will be on the 15th.

Marty L. Byers
651-483-1173


Dance

1st & 3rd Wednesdays
One Grenoble Ave, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55076

The community center for Skyline Village, on the east side of Concord St. at 75th St in Inver Grove Heights. About 2.5 miles south of I494

2nd & 4th Tuesdays
Saint Christopher's Episcopal Church, 2300 N Hamline Ave. in St. Paul.

It is at the northeast corner of Highway 36 and Hamline Avenue (Hamline is between Snelling and Lexington). The church is actually encircled by the highway entrance ramp.
The Dance Guild gathers weekly from 7PM-9PM to learn and practice historic Scottish country dances.
For more information call:

Mary at 651-699-6853 or Julie at 651-698-8375

It's a great place to meet people !

Other Guilds

Want to learn about wool spinning, weaving, or dying? Diana Steben (651-489-2881) and Kali Pederson (651-730-5437 ) organize the Fiber Guild.

Clann Tartan has our own historic site near Duluth MN. Dun Gowan is an ongoing project, which is the site of Gaffneyis Annual Tactical in July. We are finishing the fort and beginning the construction of a village this year. Contact David Vavreck at 612-378-1973 or baethan1630@yahoo.com for further information, or to volunteer to help.

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Articles

Hello all,

I just wanted to send out a note of thanks to our goodwife Maeve Kane. She has done an outstanding job of running both Tactical and Deer River. If you were at one of these events please take the time to thank her one more time for dealing with last minuet changes and a lot of unknowns.

Thanks Maeve.

As stated on the email list Julie will be having here knee surgery in the month of August. So we will be canceling the Camp drill this month and will once more resume it in September. As the last Saturday of September is the weekend prior to Big Island and that weekend is typically used to set up camp, I would like to propose that we have the Camp Drill at the Big Island Site. This will be a great way for you to work on some of the stuff that you can only normally do at events. I’ll keep you posted with a date and time.

The big three events are coming up on us fast.

As I said Big Island Rendezvous in Albert Lee starting September 29 and running through October 2. The 29 and 30 will be school days so we will need as many demos as we can field. This is a really fun event and one that you don’t want to miss.

Typically schooldays run from 9 am till around 3 pm, and on the weekend the gate opens at 10:00 a.m. and closes at 7 p.m. on Saturday and 4 p.m. on Sunday. All cars and modern equipment needs to be clear of the site prior to then and stay clear till after gate closes.

Parking is a bit of a ways away from the site but they do run a shuttle bus right up to the front gate. If you are going to arrive during show hours please come dressed in period correct clothing. Then after hours you can drive up to the site and unload. We do ask that you do this as quickly as possible. Then drive your car back to the lot. Then come set up your camp. This way the site is not filled with modern equipment.

See below for maps and directions. And well as get more information at the following address http://bigislandfestival.org.

The next event is the Mankato History Festival. This is history festival for school children. This year it will run from October 6 through October 8 with the 6th and the 7th being school days. Gate times for this event are Thursday - Friday 9am-3pm and Saturday 11am-6pm. This event takes place on the McGowan Farm in Mankato MN.

Parking is closer than at Big Island but you will still need to come dressed in period clothing if you are going to arrive during show hours. More information on this event can be found at the following address http://www.historyfest.com.

This is a great kid friendly event that is a wonderful opportunity to practice your demos at.

The last event for October is Big Muddy Rendezvous in Winona, MN. This event runs from October 11 till October 16. I will be getting more information on this event and will post it in the October News letter.

We have been doing a great job of letting Julie know that we are attending events, but what we are still lacking is knowing when you are planning on arriving and when you are leaving. So when you contact Julie please give her an estimated arrival date and time as well as your expected departure date and time. This will greatly help us do two things. One better plan for meals and two better know when we need gear on site.

Rob Johnson
Head Camp Follower

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Baethan at the Moon

David Vavreck

I have often been asked if soldiers in our period actually marched in step. Indeed, there have been articles published in our newsletter that suggested that they did not.

I’ll just lay out the evidence I have found by reading drill manuals, a dance manual, and by examining the surviving military music itself.

Arbeau’s Orchesographie (France 1589) describes how important it is for soldiers to march in step, especially when they are at battle order. He gives an eight beat rhythm (left on beat 1, right on beat 5), which give rests from beats 6 - 8, so that if a soldier gets off step, it is easy to get back into it. Arbeau states that the French, Swiss and other armies do so. He also discusses the six beat variant (left on beat one, right on beat 4). Furthermore, he points out that it is much easier to teach soldiers to dance than others, as they already know how to step in rhythm to the beat of the drum.

Mersenne’s Harmonie Universale (France 1636) lists English, Dutch, Spanish and German national marches in a context which suggests that they also followed Arbeau’s 5 beat, 3 rest marching measure.

Davies’ Military Directions (England 1618) states that soldiers march in rhythm to the drum, and also makes the dancing/marching analogy.

Markham’s Souldiers Accidence (England 1635), Barriffe’s Military Discipline (England 1635), and Fisher’s Soldier’s Practice (England 1643) all explicitly state that soldiers march to the rhythm of the drum.

Venn’s Military Observation or the Tacticks Put into Practice (England 1672) and Holme’s Academy of Armory (England c.1688) imply the same.

Most surviving 17th century national and regimental marches also follow Arbeau’s basic cadence - even art music such as Byrd’s "Battle Suite" follows the same basic rhythmic pattern, which reinforces that it was normal to march in cadence. Some surviving marches, such as the Scots March, use the six beat measure. Either way, a strong simple beat tells the soldiers when to step; that’s part of what makes a particular piece of music a march.

Arbeau points out that although the standard pace of measure is 5 feet, the standard pace while marching is 4 feet. Clayton's Approoved order of Martiall Discipline (England 1591) gives the standard pace of 5 feet. A standard pace is neccessary when marching in step.

Pistolfilo’s Il Torneo, the earliest surviving military drum manual (Italy 1621) even shows where the footfalls occur right on the drum score, and also includes the pickup beats before the marching actually commences still used by marching bands today to prepare for that first footfall.

Furthermore, soldiers on the march at their own rate get very spread out, which puts the troops at much greater risk from ambush, surprise attack, etc. It also makes traveling from a to b much more time consuming for the army as a whole. Especially in enemy territory, there needs to be time to reset the camp at the end of the march, fortify it, and feed and water the soldiers, horses, and whatever other livestock, often hold a religious service and preferably get a good night’s sleep before doing it all again the next day.

At any rate, marching an army (as opposed to simply walking) is the most efficient way to accomplish all this. And in all that I have read, although cavalrymen may use the term "ride" to describe their travels, soldiers always use "march" - not walk, amble, perambulate, saunter, or stroll - to describe theirs.

So what we have here is nine written sources which all say the same thing: soldiers are trained to march in step. Considering how mundane marching is, it is a bit of a surprise that there is any documentation of this at all. And marching is further supported by most of the surviving 17th century marches and calls - well over 100 pieces - which have that same, obvious cadence to them.

The closest thing to period documentation to contradict this is Arbeau's statement that sometimes soldiers cannot march any better than they can handle their weapons. Granted, a brand new soldier may be a lousy marcher, but that is why we drill. I think it safe at this point to categorically state that marching in step is something that most (if not all) 17th century European armies practised, and is something Gaffneyis Regiment should as well. It will add to our professional appearance, which can only add to our ranks in the long run.

And it is easy; you only have to listen. And come to our monthly drills.

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SCOTS AND THEIR BLOODY SWORDS

by: Marty Byers

In 1638, the Earl of Atholl took a roll and found that between 523 men, 734 weapons were owned. Out of that number, 451 swords were counted. Prior to 1747, the Highlanders were some of Europes most completely armed,..." it is well known that Highlanders go about almost constantly armed, partly with a view of being always ready to defend themselves or to attack their enemies, and party that being accustomed to the instruments of deaththay may be less apprehensive of them.",according to James Logan, in The Scottish Gael, printed in 1831.

Every clansman had a duty to his chief, actually, he had several duties. Responsibilities, such as tending the flocks, the fields and helping provide food for the clan, just among the many. But, no matter what he did in everyday life, it was his duty to own and be proficient with weapons. It was every clansman's duty to come to the defense of the clan, when the chief said it was needed. Such weapons as muskets, pistols, pole arms axes, targes, dirks and swords, were usually among the clan's armory.

Numerous accounts of 17th and 18th century combat, involving Highlanders, prove that experitese with swords befell many Scotts. In 1655, Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, along with 32 of his houshold troops ( luchd-tagh) fought with 138 English soldiers, destroying them all...with only a loss of 5 of his own people.

The Scots had a wide variety of blades in their armory ( not that the all had all the different swords). But different swords were usually picked up after different battles or in trade.

Given his choice, a Scottish Highlander would choose a long, broad, but thin cutting sword, which the Germans named Grossen Schotten, or " Broad Scots" blade. As early as 1520, Highlanders produced a simple basket hilt broadsword, and by 1576 these swords were known as "heland hiltis". They are currently known as " Irish Hilts".

Though some claim that the bigger the sword, the better, Parodoxes of Defense, 1598, noted that the sword should not be " too heavy of his strength that has it" and the blade must be of "convenient length with his stature that has it."

Highland Scots believed that if something works, then don't fix it. The same is said in their sword fighting techniques, if it kills your enemy, then don't go changing it. The men of the Highlands used the same sword play for nearly 300 years. It did what was needing to be done and there was no need to change it. As a matter of fact, styles that has passed on by 1600 , in Europe, still remained in use as late as 1745. And, in 1630, highland warriors were a good as any on the battlefield, with a sword.

However, swords were not the only weapon found on the fighting lines. Dirks, targes, pikes, Lochaber Axes, various pole arms and muskets all filleed the ranks of a good army. And, in opposing these weapons, one needed to study their uses and their weeknesses. One man could not possibly study the action of all these weapons, in combat, where their full potential could be seen, without suffering damage. It took several men, who had fought against different weapons, and survived, to cover the full range of combat that an individual may face. So, no one correct way of sword fighting could ever be formulated. It took the studying of the masters to become an expert against many different weapons.

As Scotland was a non-literary culture, the records of swordsmanship are, prior to the late 1600's, unavailable. The sword fighting techniques of the time were lost with the death of the one handling the sword.

FIGHTING TIPS

First of all, one must have the correct length sword.

" To know the perfect length of your sword, you shall stand with your sword and dagger drawn" it continues, " keeping out your dagger arm, drawing back your sword as far as conveniently you can, not opening the elbow joint of your sword arm, and look what you can draw within your dagger, that is the just length of your sword, to be made according to your own stature."

" The perfect length of your two handed sword is, the blade to be the length of the blade of your single sword."

Whenever posible, avoid blocking or parying an attempted strike. Let it go by, then move in quickly and strike at the enemy, while his weapon is out of harms path. If neccessary, block upward or downward. The longer the opposing weapon, the harder it is to bring it back to the defense position. Also, by blocking up or down, the weapon is out of the way for attacks by one's own forces.

When against a longer weapon, always move inside the maximum reach of the weapon, not much damage is done with the broadside of the weapon or arm.

ACCOUNTS

Through time , in Scotland, several accounts have been recorded, verbal or in print, describing the aftermath of various battles. Common to most accounts is the affect of the Highland swordsmanship, using the broadsword. As late as 1745, Scots still used medievel tactics and swordplay on the battlefield.

In 1689 Lowland Scots and English troops were "horrified" by the damage done by the Highland broadsword, at Killiekrankie.

" Many officers and soldiers were cut down through the scull and neck, to the very breasts; others had sculls cut off above the ears. Some had both their bodies and crossbelts cut through at one blow; pikes and small swords were cut like willows."

Again, a local newpaper, in 1745 gives a description of the post battle field at the Battle of Prestonpans. " ...the field of battle presented and appalling spectacle rarely exhibited even in the most bloody conflicts. As almost all the slain were cut down by the broadsword and the scythe, the ground was trewn with head, legs, arms, hands and mutilated bodies."

In both accounts, desriptions showed that the primary attack, that delivered the fatal blow was " a descending cut to the head." With a broadsword, this might have been part of a "Highland Charge".

While Highland Scots were usually accused of being slow to adapt to new military technologies, in some cases as much as 200 years behind the times, they were able to make changes, to adapt to the issues facing them on the battlefield.

Until the introduction of firearms, on the batllefield, the Scots had the advantage. Their men would stand toe to toe with the enemy, and by sheer body strength and practice of technique, would sent the enemy running, in hopes of never having to face them again.

Highland Scots knew their weapons, what they could do with them and how to make them to things that wouldn't normally be done. And by adapting their methods, were able to withstand countless attacks, with mininal casualties. Though 200 years behind the military times, they were a force to be reconed with.

 

BIBIOGRAPHY

Silver, George, Paradoxes of Defence, 1599

Rector, Mark, Highland Swordsmanship, Techniques of the Scottish Swordmasters, 2001

Wallace,J, Scottish Swords and Dirks: A Reference Guide to Scottish Edged Weapons, 1970

Logan, James, The Scottish Gael, 1831

Andrews, Larry L., The Cutting Edge: A Practical Guide to the Use of Scottish Highland Weapons, The Complete Edition, 1995

Wagner, Eduard, Swords and Daggers: An Illustrated Handbook, 1975

Hill, James Michael, Celtic Warfare 1595-1763, 1986

Hope, Sir William, The Scots Fencing Master, 1687

McBane, Donald, The Expert Sword-Man's Companion, 1728

Silver, George, Brief Instructions upon my Paradoxes of Defence, 1605

Talhoffer, Hans, Medievel Combat: A Fifteenth-Century Illustrated Manual of Swordfighting and Close-Quarter Combat, translated by Mark Rector, 2000

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Calendar of Events

Be sure to contact your staff
if you plan on attending a show event. Try to give at least a ten day notice when possible. This allows proper planning for the feeding of our members, and in some cases is required by event organizers to allow entry as a participant.
You can call any of the staff members listed, or send an email to staff@clanntartan.org.

SEPTEMBER 2005

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
Board Meeting
7PM @Bruce and Julie's  
6
 
7
Dance 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
Dance 
14
 
15
Sword Drill at
Marty and Judy's
651.483.1173
mjlbyers@msn.com 
16
 
17
Drill 
18
 
19
 
20
Night at the Pub
Molly Quinn's
Minneapolis 
21
Dance 
22
 
23
 
24
CAMP DRILL
10AM to 4PM
Please call a staff
member for location 
25
 
26
 
27
Dance 
28
 
29
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN 
30
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN 
Oct. 1
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN 

OCTOBER 2005

SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

 

 

 
1
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN  
2
Big Island Rendezvous
Albert Lea, MN  
3
Board Meeting
7PM @Bruce and Julie's  
4
 
5
Dance 
6
Mankato History Fest
Mankato MN 
7
Mankato History Fest
Mankato MN 
8
Mankato History Fest
Mankato MN 
9
 
10
 
11
Big Muddy River Rendezvous
Winona MN
***
Dance 
12
Big Muddy River Rendezvous
Winona MN 
13
Big Muddy River Rendezvous
Winona MN 
14
Big Muddy River Rendezvous
Winona MN 
15
Big Muddy River Rendezvous
Winona MN 
16
Big Muddy River Rendezvous
Winona MN 
17
 
18
Night at the Pub
Molly Quinn's
Minneapolis 
19
Dance 
20
Sword Drill at
Marty and Judy's
651.483.1173
mjlbyers@msn.com 
 
21
 
22
CAMP DRILL
10AM to 4PM
Please call a staff
member for location 
23
 
24
 
25
Dance 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
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Upcoming Events:

Big Island Rendezvous--September 29-October 2--Albert Lea MN
Mankato History Fest--October 6-8--Mankato MN
Big Muddy River Rendezvous--October 11-16--Winona MN
Siege of Stralsund--November 17-20--Philadelphia PA

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Maps

Map to Inver Grove Heights location- Dance Map to St. Paul location St. Christopher's- Dance
Map to Board Meetings
Bruce and Julie Yoder's Home
Map to Board/Quarterly/Annual Meetings
Corcoran Park, Minneapolis

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Event Maps and Notification

Big Island Albert Lea, MN September 29-October 2, 2005

Location
Big Island Rendevous is located in Albert Lea, MN - just off Interstate 35 about 98 miles south of the Twin Cities.
Drive Time
Allow about 2 hours from the Twin Cities.
Directions
  • From Minneapolis or Saint Paul, take I35 South to I90 in Albert Lea.
  • Take I90 West to the 90 west take exit 157 (one mile)
  • Turn Left and head South on Bridge Avenue to Hammer Road (about 1 mile).
  • Turn Right and head East on Hammer Road to the park entrance.
  • You will be able to drive on-site before and after show hours. Our camp will be located inside the park area.
    Maps



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    Mankato History Festival Mankato MN Oct 6-8 2005

    Hwy 169 into Mankato;
    Left at the Hillcrest Health Care Center ( if you go past the flashing lights at Co Road 68 you've gone too far);
    Left onto Shamrock Lane;
    follow this to it's end (Jack McGowan's on the map)

     


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    Big Muddy Rendezvous Winona, MN October 11-16 2005

    Approximate Travel Distance: From Minneapolis - 139 miles (3.5 hours)
    From Saint Paul - 118 miles (3.0 hours)
    From Minneapolis:

    Take HWY94 East to HWY52 Follow HWY52 South to I-90
    Take I-90 East to MN-43 Take MN-43 exit #252 North towards Winona
    Head North on E Lake Blvd (Hwy 61), it will turn into W Lake Blvd, until you get to Co Rd 14 (Pelzer) Turn right (East) on Pelzer and follow to Riverview.
    Follow Riverview to Prairie Island Road.
    From Saint Paul:

    Take HWY61 South to Winona. In Winona, HWY61 becomes W Lake Blvd.
    Turn left (East) on Pelzer and follow to Riverview. Follow Riverview to Prairie Island Road.


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